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9.6.20

BREAKING: Senator Thom Tillis At Center of Bombshell Report From Washington Post On Alleged Louis DeJoy Straw Donor Scheme

WaPo: “One Of The Biggest Beneficiaries Of Donations From New Breed Employees Has Been GOP Sen. Thom Tillis of North Carolina”

Tillis Has Failed To Stand Up To DeJoy As Delays Hurt North Carolina Veterans, Rural Communities

RALEIGH, NC – Today, the Washington Post unveiled an alleged straw donor scheme led by Senator Thom Tillis donor Postmaster General Louis DeJoy in which DeJoy reportedly pressured employees at his company to make political donations and then reimbursed workers for the donations, a major violation of state and federal campaign finance laws. Tillis finds himself at the center of this alleged scheme, as the Washington Post reports, “One of the biggest beneficiaries of donations from New Breed employees has been GOP Sen. Thom Tillis of North Carolina, whose campaign committees collected nearly $300,000 from people at the company in 2014, campaign finance records show.”

Tillis has received almost $50,000 from DeJoy and his wife and DeJoy has donated to super PACs that have spent heavily in favor of Tillis. 

As reports of postal delays surfaced in recent weeks under DeJoy’s leadership, including delays in North Carolina veterans receiving their prescription drugs on time, Tillis has failed to demand accountability from DeJoy in response, at times even defending his donor. 

Read more below. 


Washington Post: Louis DeJoy’s rise as GOP fundraiser was powered by contributions from company workers who were later reimbursed, former employees say

By Aaron C. Davis, Amy Gardner and Jon Swaine – September 5, 2020

  • Louis DeJoy’s prolific campaign fundraising, which helped position him as a top Republican power broker in North Carolina and ultimately as head of the U.S. Postal Service, was bolstered for more than a decade by a practice that left many employees feeling pressured to make political contributions to GOP candidates — money DeJoy later reimbursed through bonuses, former employees say.
  • Five people who worked for DeJoy’s former business, New Breed Logistics, say they were urged by DeJoy’s aides or by the chief executive himself to write checks and attend fundraisers at his 15,000-square-foot gated mansion beside a Greensboro, N.C., country club. There, events for Republicans running for the White House and Congress routinely fetched $100,000 or more apiece.
  • Two other employees familiar with New Breed’s financial and payroll systems said DeJoy would instruct that bonus payments to staffers be boosted to help defray the cost of their contributions, an arrangement that would be unlawful.
  • A Washington Post analysis of federal and state campaign finance records found a pattern of extensive donations by New Breed employees to Republican candidates, with the same amount often given by multiple people on the same day. Between 2000 and 2014, 124 individuals who worked for the company together gave more than $1 million to federal and state GOP candidates. Many had not previously made political donations, and have not made any since leaving the company, public records show. During the same period, nine employees gave a combined $700 to Democrats.
  • One of the biggest beneficiaries of donations from New Breed employees has been GOP Sen. Thom Tillis of North Carolina, whose campaign committees collected nearly $300,000 from people at the company in 2014, campaign finance records show.
  • The month the deal closed, New Breed employees made a slew of political donations in a two-day period — more than $407,000. Almost three-quarters of that went to support Tillis’s Senate bid.
  • Clarke, Hauck and DeJoy were among 10 New Breed employees who led the giving. On Sept. 29, each gave identical donations of $12,600 to the Thom Tillis Victory Committee, campaign finance data shows. The next day, the same 10 employees each gave $10,000 to the North Carolina Republican Party.
  • Since then, five of those individuals have significantly cut back their political contributions, and one has not given again at all, FEC filings show.
  • DeJoy never replied to his note, Young said. One of the last things he heard from anyone at New Breed came about a year after he left. Hauck, who by then was working with DeJoy at XPO, called and asked Young to donate to Tillis and other Republicans. “I said, ‘No, thank you.’ ”